DEBRIS IS A SERIES OF BLACK STONE-WALLS IN THE MIDDLE OF THE MOROCCAN DESERT. THE WALLS BELONG TO ABANDONED HOMES AND STABLES, AND THEY ARE BETWEEN 7 AND 33 METERS LONG AND BETWEEN 2 AND 7 METERS TALL. THE WALLS WERE PAINTED OVER UTILISING CARBON-BASED PIGMENT, WHICH RENDERS THEM INTO MATTE SURFACES THAT ABSORB ALMOST ALL LIGHT.

WHEN TRAVELLING THROUGH THE DESERT, DEBRIS APPEARS AS A SMALL DISTINCT BLACK PUNCTUM IN THE IMMENSE EXTENT OF SUN-BLEACHED DUST AND STONE, A SPOT THAT DEFINES MORE A PLACE IN TIME RATHER THAN SPACE. IF ONE WAS TO PILGRIM TO IT, THEY WOULD OBSERVE IT ENLARGING AS THEY APPROACH, UNTIL THE SKY WOULD GET SWALLOWED BY ITS DARKNESS AND THEY WOULD GET ABSORBED TOO.  

DEBRIS OFFERS A PAUSE FROM CHAOS. WHEN EXPERIENCING IT, THE VIEWER IS PROPOSED WITH A SANCTUARY INSIDE A “BLACK HOLE”, WHERE TIME IS PLIABLE AND CAN BECOME ENORMOUS. WITH ITS INHERENT LIMINALITY, DEBRIS IS ALSO A SEPARATION AND A GATE. IT EXISTS IN THE SPACE BETWEEN “BEFORE” AND “AFTER” ENGAGING WITH IT.

WHAT REMAINS OF DEBRIS IS A SERIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS, SUBJECT OF A DIFFERENT RESEARCH. PHOTOGRAPHIC CONSEQUENCES USES COLOR MODIFICATION AND OTHER TECHNIQUES AS A MEAN TO ENHANCE THE DETACHMENT OF DEBRIS FROM ITS SURROUNDINGS, CONTRASTING THE ARCHETYPICAL BLACK WALL AND ITS BARREN ENVIRONMENT.










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